seanmonstar

Mar 25 2014

Your Password is Insecure

We know that you should have a unique, sufficiently-long, sufficiently-randomized password for every property that requires one. We also know that if you most likely don’t do this whatsoever. There’s no way we’re going to change users’ habits. So this is the reason why we need to get rid of passwords.1

You may think the danger exists with someone guessing your password at your bank, or your email account. Instead, those websites have teams of professionals who spend their whole working day keeping out hackers. That’s not where the danger starts. The danger starts at a tiny e-commerce site, or webforum, or other small-scale site. Some site where you’d think “I don’t care if this account is stolen.” Those are the dangerous sites. Even if you think your password is a pretty good one, because it doesn’t contain any personalized information, and looks like gibberish: if you use the same password, then your password is as weak as the weakest site you use it at.

What really happens: a mom-and-pop shop that sells honey decides to sell more via a website, and has you log in to remember your shipping address. They’re not security experts. They didn’t hire any either. A hacker aims for sites like those. The hacker only has to get passed the minimal security of Honey Buns, to find a list of e-mails and passwords. Maybe the passwords aren’t even hashed; they’re just sitting there in plain text. You shouldn’t be worried that the hacker can ship an insane amount of honey to your house. They wouldn’t bother. Instead, they will take that list, and try each e-mail/password combo on important sites: Wells Fargo, Bank of America, Gmail, Paypal, etc. You used the same email and password on one of those sites as you did with Honey Buns? Then the hacker has just successfully logged in as you, and it mostly looks like a normal login. They then transfer money to their account, and carry on.2


  1. I’ve been explaining this to anyone who has asked me about Persona and passwords, and figured it’d be nice to have it in a linkable quotable location. 

  2. Of course, those sites try to protect against this too. They might notice the IP address is from a completely different part of the world. And they might prevent dangerous actions from that IP until you’ve confirmed another e-mail challenge. But the point still stands.